Independent, High Quality Home Inspections

Call to Schedule 503.816.6098#

promote your business with us



Useful Information

Maintenance to do as a home owner


Monthly
  • Test smoke detectors
  • Test GFCI outlets
Spring
  • Check caulking and weather-stripping around doors and windows. Repair or replace, if necessary (twice per year.)
  • Inspect exterior siding and trim for cracks and openings. Fill with caulk, if necessary (twice per year.)
  • Clean leaves and tree debris from gutters (quarterly.)
  • Trim vegetation (i.e., shrubs and trees) away from house and roof contact (twice per year.)
  • Drain or partially drain water heater (twice per year.) Follow manufacturer's recommendation.
  • Examine furnace filters. Replace, if necessary (quarterly.)
  • Remove lint from clothes dryer exhaust vent (at exterior.)
Summer
  • Clean leaves and tree debris from gutters (quarterly.)
  • Inspect exterior siding and trim for peeling paint or exposed wood. Prep and paint, if necessary (twice per year.
  • Clean / vacuum A/C condenser grill and interior.
  • Remove moss and tree debris from roof. Repair / replace damaged shingles / shakes / flashing, if necessary.
  • Check perimeter foundation for cracks / water penetration. Fill with sealant, if necessary.
  • Examine furnace filters, Replace, if necessary (quarterly.)
  • Have furnace professionally cleaned and serviced (at least once every two years.)
  • Inspect crawlspace for plumbing leaks and pest infestation (i.e., rodents and insects.)
  • Remove lint from clothes dryer exhaust vent (at exterior.)
Fall
  • Winterize exterior faucets.
  • Check caulking and weather-stripping around doors and windows. Repair or replace, if necessary (twice per year.)
  • Inspect exterior siding and trim for cracks and openings. Fill with caulk, if necessary (twice per year.)
  • Inspect exterior siding and trim for peeling paint or exposed wood. Prep and paint, if necessary (twice per year.)
  • Clean leaves and tree debris from gutters (quarterly.)
  • Trim vegetation (i.e., shrubs and trees) away from house and roof contact (twice per year.)
  • Drain or partially drain water heater (twice per year.) Follow manufacturer's recommendation.
  • Examine furnace filters. Replace, if necessary (quarterly.)
  • Remove lint from clothes dryer exhaust vent (at exterior.)
Winter
  • Clean refrigerator coils (on the back or underneath) with a vacuum cleaner.
  • Clean leaves and tree debris from gutters (quarterly.)
  • Examine furnace filters. Replace, if necessary (quarterly.)
  • Remove lint from clothes dryer exhaust vent (at exterior.)
  • Examine condition of caulk / grout at bathroom showers / tubs. Repair or replace, if necessary.

New Construction Inspection

After countless hours of searching and looking at houses you've finally decided to go with brand new one. Congratulations! Buying a new house is a very wise choice. The fact is houses have never been built better, safer or more efficient than they are today. A well built new home should provide years of comfort, convenience and happiness.

So, it's new, surely you don't need a new house inspection do you?

The fact is a house is a very complex machine. Hundreds of people will assemble thousands of items to produce the final product you will be paying for every month for the next 30 years.

Realistically, things get missed and forgotten during construction. Builders, no matter how competent or diligent, will miss things. This is simply inevitable given the tight profit margins they must work under in today's highly competitive new house market.

But the county building official inspects the house as it's being built so I don't need a new house inspection do I?

True, county building inspectors will oversee the general construction of your new house. But, like most things with government agencies these days, there are budgets to meet and in the end something must suffer. If we can barely manage to fund schools for our children or police to keep us safe how much effort do you really think goes into any individual house?

So, what does Top Notch Home Inspection cover?

Your new house will be inspected from top to bottom. The following are the general systems that will be evaluated:

  • Building Envelope
  • Structural Components
  • Roof and Gutters
  • Site Grading and Drainage
  • Crawl Space
  • Attic
  • Interior
  • Appliances
  • Heating and Air-Conditioning System
  • Electrical System
  • Plumbing System
 

So, once you realize how valuable a new house inspection is, why use Top Notch Home Inspection?

We have performed thousands of new house inspections over the past 20 years. We work with many builders, property developers and local real estate agents that deal exclusively with new houses. Top Notch Home Inspection has the experience and knowledge to provide you with a thorough new house inspection.

Crawl Spaces

In short, most problems throughout crawl spaces in Oregon are the result of excessive moisture or a lack of proper ventilation.

A crawl space is typically defined as any void space beneath a heated living space that has a bare dirt floor. In most cases, crawl spaces are surrounded by a perimeter concrete foundation and have some point of access, either from the exterior of the space or from a hatch in the floor of the living space above.

Crawl spaces are an efficient way to construct living space but have a certain number of common construction practices that must be followed to ensure good long term performance. The following are common problems found in or around crawl spaces that often result in problems:

Lack of access: If you can't get in, you can't discover damage or perform repairs. A crawl space should have an adequate access hatch and clear working space beneath the floor framing. An access hatch should be at least 16" X 24" and have no pipes, electrical cables or other items routed across it. Once inside, there should be a bare minimum of 18" of clearance beneath any floor framing to allow movement throughout the space. Additional clearance is necessary around all heating ducts, plumbing pipes and other mechanical lines to allow access to all portions of the crawl space. Crawl spaces that lack this access often require extensive work when a home is sold as they are typically not able to be financed by many lenders.

Inadequate ventilation: In Oregon, most wood destroying insects and rot fungi flourish in a moist environment. All crawl spaces must have properly sized and placed vents around the perimeter to allow air to flow throughout the space. Additionally, the area in front of the vent openings must be kept clear of dirt, leaves and other items and must be covered by screens to keep rodents and other pests out.

Missing or improperly installed vapor Barrier: A 6 mil black plastic vapor barrier must be properly installed over any bare soil in a crawl space to prevent moisture inherent to the ground from seeping into and lingering throughout the crawl space. A properly installed vapor barrier is overlapped at least 12" at any seams and has no rips, tears or other inconsistencies. Missing or improperly installed vapor barriers are often the cause of insect damage, wood rot and other problems.

Debris: Wood scraps and other debris provide food and habitat for insects and rodents and should be removed from a crawl space, if present. In general, any items that can be gathered with a standard garden rake should be removed.

Animal Droppings: It's very common for raccoons, possums, cats, rats and other rodents to access crawl spaces through missing or damaged vent screen openings. Once inside, these animals often damage the under floor insulation and heating ducts, and leave droppings and carcasses throughout the space. In addition to the damage to the building being corrected, the droppings and carcasses are a health hazard to people working in the space and should be removed. Additionally, it is often necessary to replace part or the entire contaminated vapor barrier throughout a crawl space after animal activity.

Water/Moisture: Keeping the moisture level in a crawl space to a minimum is a very important step in preventing damage from wood destroying insects and wood rot. All surfaces around the perimeter of the house should slope away to prevent water from collecting near the structure. Additionally, all roof runoff should be routed into storm drains or otherwise away from the house to prevent water from collecting near the building.

NOTE: For maintenance schedules and procedures for appliances, refer to the owner's manual.

Contact Info


 
  • Jeff Hayes
  • Certified Oregon Home Inspector
  • OCHI # 1537
  • CCB # 202299
  •  
  • Cell/Direct: 503.816.6098
  • Office/Fax: 503.657.4257
  • Email: jeff@tnhinspection.com

  • Address:
  • 16415 Wayne Dr.
  • Oregon City, OR 97045
 
$10,000 Honor Guarantee, Backed by InterNACHI Certified by the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors Read Unbiased Consumer Reviews Online at AngiesList.com
Home Inspection in Portland
K & D Hayes Construction, Inc. Reviews Screened and Approved
Home Inspectors in Portland